Zaha Hadid

Zaha Hadid, Arabic: زها حديد‎; born 31 October 1950 is an Iraqi-British architect and winner of the Pritzker Architecture Prize in 2004, and the Stirling Prize in 2010 and 2011.

When London’s Olympic organizers needed a knockout venue that would wow the International Olympic Committee and hold the world’s attention, they turned to Zaha Hadid, a provocateur who critics have described as “the Lady Gaga of architecture”.

Iraqi-born Hadid is one of the greatest architects alive. In 2004, she became the first woman to win the Pritzker Prize, architecture’s greatest honor. The year prior, she was awarded the European Union Mies van der Rohe Prize for a tram station in Strasbourg.

Besides art museums and opera houses, she has designed temporary pop-up structures — such as a handbag-inspired mobile pavilion for Chanel — a ski jump in Austria, furniture, door handles, a tea and coffee set and vase for Alessi, and plastic high heels for Brazilian shoe brand Melissa. Not all of her work is exclusively for the wealthy. She also won last year’s RIBA Stirling Prize for redesigning a state school in Brixton, South London.

Hadid’s Aquatic Centre is the first venue you see when you enter the Olympic village. A £269m facility that houses two swimming pools and a diving pool, and seats 22,500, critics have pronounced it the Olympics “most majestic” space.

But for decades, Hadid languished in the shadows, her work dismissed as “unbuildable” and her atelier rarely commissioned in her adopted city.

Zaha Hadid “I will always have two regrets,” she told Leading Women. “I don’t have a presence in London, and I would have liked to have done more work in the Middle East

“There are 360 degrees, so why stick to one?”
― Zaha Hadid

Source, CNN, Wikipedia

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